2017: Globe at Night Real-time Interactive Infographic

So far in 2017, Globe at Night has received

2,516 Observations

from 48 Countries

& 43 US states

Data is submitted via mobile devices, as well as desktop & laptop computers

Data can be submitted via our web app on both mobile and desktop/laptops. Additionally, two native mobile apps - Loss of the Night (LON) for iPhone and Android, and Dark Sky Meter (DSM) for iPhone - support Globe at Night. You can view the breakdown of how many observations have been made from the various devices and methods in the charts above.

Distribution of Observations by Area

Use the dropdowns above to view the range of limiting magnitudes submitted for the given country or US state.

What happened to the Zero Limiting Magnitudes?

You can get a Limiting Magnitudes (LM) of 0 (zero) if you have extreme light pollution in your area, but you also may not be able to see any stars due to cloud cover. The pie chart to the right breaks down the reported Cloud Cover for LMs of 0, showing that the vast majority of those observations in 2017 (~70%) have been due to cloud cover of 50% or more. So we don’t show the zero LMs in the histograms.

What’s happening near you?

See how your region is doing this year below. If you don‘t see very many data points, consider going outside tonight and contributing your own! Compare to other regions or previous years with our regional map generator.

Web App Translation Use Around the World

Globe at Night is a truly international project, with data submitted from around the world. To facilitate this process we have had the web app and other materials translated into many languages. So far in 2017, Citizen Scientists from around the world have submitted their data in 8 different languages (other than English). You can see the results in the chart to the left. Choose a language from the menu below to see a chart of where the various languages have been used to submit data.

Want to get involved?

It’s easy - pick a clear night during a monthly campaign, and use our web app to submit your data. There are lots of things to learn on the website, whether you need help finding the constellation, or want to know more about light pollution, we’ve got you covered!

Thanks for taking time to check out Globe at Night!